Great to chat with Jason Huang, Founder and TS Conductor, TS Conductor has developed a conductor that outperforms all current transmission & distribution conductors on the market! We discussed improving a 100 years old technology, bottlenecks in the power grid, building a strong company culture and more!

If you would like to contact TS Conductor please email ​info@tsconductor.com

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James

The unedited podcast transcript is below

James McWalter

Hello today we’re speaking with Jason Huang founder of TSconductor welcome to the podcast Jason! great to start. Could you tell us a little bit about TSconductor?

Jason Huang

James thank you very much for the opportunity.

Jason Huang

TSconductor I would argue it is the best conductor that has been developed in history. It reflects the ultimate combination of best materials that is available today. To be able to conductor in the technology we use the most conductive aluminum type and we also feature a carbon fiber composite that has all the attributes. The industry has been looking for extremely high strengths lowest way possible. And it does not have a so more expansion problem which creates sag when you are able to combine the 2 mature together. You basically have that ultimate combination. What material science offers on top of that. We have a design that is enabling I would call that a breakthrough design we leverage aluminum to protect the carbon composite and we leverage the carbon composite to provide all the strength technical characteristics that protection from the aluminum. That is unique to us that provides guarantee for safety reliability longevity that has been missing in the industry for the past century.

James McWalter

And why and this might be a basic question but why are and conductors so important and.

Jason Huang

Yes, when you think about you know electricity. It’s about electrons we generate electrons from Generation site nowadays. It’s ah um, it’s all about renewboard generation and these are normally in the remote places. Our consumption side which is called Load Center These are the cities you have to move the Electron and that is where you need the pipeline for the Electron that is the conductor that we have power grid the power grid. Ah basically. You have towers you have conductors that are supported by the towers or poles and it’s the Conductor. That’s the ah pipeline for Electrons. You know when you talk about other forms of energy oil and gas you have pipelines when you talk about. Transporting humans and goods you talk about automobiles roads and it’s the same thing you have to move it. That’s why conductor is important and it’s a critical piece of power Grid Power Grid is also the critical piece for our. Energy infrastructure and you could also argue Electricity is the blood or energy is the blood of our economy without that you cannot run.

James McWalter

I go farther I’d say civilization right? We don’t have a lot if without electricity and the way we’ve completely constructed. Um the economy and civilization and in general and I guess like thinking back to the beginning of of Ts conductor. You know what drove the initial decision.

Jason Huang

Um, yeah.

James McWalter

Ah, to kind of go on this path and start this company and.

Jason Huang

Yeah I left my prior employer in 2017 and I had the um I would say the opportunity to acquire this technology. This was invented by someone else who is not. Affiliated with the industry because the technology’s uniqueness actually calls for outsider to be the innovator. It kind of looks to be a little bit impractic or stiff. But when you actually do it. They’ve learned that you could actually make it even more amenable to. What the industry need. So I had the fortune to acquire the technology and I I would say part of the reason is due to my um, my understanding of the industry my understanding of the prior technology which I had the fortune to lead as the. Ceo of the other company and so I know what is missing and I know you know when you see a great solution. You just get excited about it that you jump on it with all your heart and soul and your resources.

James McWalter

Yeah, and absolutely and so was it. You were looking for something better and you kind of came across this this research and development that this other person worked on or did it just kind of.

Jason Huang

That’s what what I have done.

James McWalter

You know you came across their research and were like oh this is like an amazing application of their technology.

Jason Huang

Yeah, yeah, that’s a good question I was aware of it but I was not involved in it and when I had the opportunity to act I basically seized the moment and made a decision to commit myself rest of my. My career and put all of what what I have on the line to to help take that technology forward and with everybody’s help. We can make this technology mainstream and we can make a tremendous difference in climate change or just give you a simple example, the efficiency this technology brings We can potentially cut about half of the greenhouse Gas emission associated with.

James McWalter

Please.

Jason Huang

Composory generation. What is a compository generation. You might ask today based on doe numbers. There is about 8.3% of the electricity that is lost due to resistance heating we call that line loss.

Jason Huang

Because whenever you have a conductor you have resistance and you pass current through it. There is a simple high school physics I square times r which is a resistance heing and that is always there when you have a conductor that has lower resistance which is basically more efficient. You’re gonna be able to cut. On that loss so globally 8.3% of the electricity. That’s generated is lost to line loss and it is about two Thousand Terawatt hours of electricity wasted every year to make up for that loss. You do composatory generation basically means. You generate far more than you need just to make up for that compository generation using today’s ah the power generation mix 30% renewable 70% traditional. We are creating about 1000000000 Ton of greenhouse gas every year every year and if you can improve efficiency by half you are basically cutting out 500000000 ton of greenhouse gas every year

James McWalter

It Yeah,, that’s that’s phenomenal I mean I think there’s this ah phrase within the kind of climate tech community of the your products that have Gigaton impact something that actually can go to that level of scale and then have that level of ah you know effect. On the carbon emissions and so when you’re talking about that level of numbers and because electricity is ubiquitous around the world and we’re just building more right? like the world population is Larger. We’re electrifying more and more of the world and so that Compenseratory energy loss is actually just going to increase on Net unless we have technologies like this to.

Jason Huang

Yeah, and to other data points I think it is not well known out there in the community one is the renewables we have today a lot of these projects whether it’s solar or wind.

James McWalter

You know mitigators.

Jason Huang

90% of them in our country here are not able to be integrated to the power grid because we have bottlenecks in the power grid. The average weight is about 3.5 years and in some other countries. It’s actually even longer. So.

James McWalter

This is.

Jason Huang

If You are able to deep Autoneck The power grid for example with our technology using existing right away in existing structures like the towers and the poles we can bring the capacity to 20250 even 300% of the Baseline capacity. And that’s going to transform how the renewables can be Integrated. You know we’d love to have more support from the community in terms of you know, asking utilities and asking our regulators to give advanced technology like ours. You know a closer look. In terms of faster Adoption. We do work in the industry that is slow and this is why all the support from all the aspects of the society would be very beneficial. Um.

James McWalter

Yeah, no absolutely and I would love to kind of dive into some of those kind of elements of the bottleneck in a moment but I guess coming a little bit back to that. Ah, earlier part of the story. So You yeah you recognize this technology and you’re like okay this this is going to solve this massive problem of. You know energy loss that is occurring on the grid today. What was the process of going from there to basically making it something that is a product that could be actually be deployed and utilized and I guess what were the kind of steps and were there any pivots along the way that.

Jason Huang

Yeah I think there are quite a few one of them is manufacturing one um, manufacturing the industry slow for a reason they expect reliability at any cost we actually put safety in the reliability as.

James McWalter

And.

Jason Huang

1 of the 6 core principles at Ts and in our manufacturing process. We’ve developed x-ray machines that allows you to ensure integrity of the composite material inside the conductor you can argue that every single inch of our conductor get inspected. Ah, nondestructively and we also deploy smart manufacturing in our system you have lot of video monitoring smart monitoring technologies today. The cloud storage is very cheap. We we basically. Ah, create a environment like a restaurant you have open kitchen that people can see through the glass we can provide that to our customers to to give that level of certainty to our customer base. So the safety reliability longevity. Not only you have to design it in. Which is what we have done but also in the manufacturing phase making sure they’re made properly then you can provide that safety reliability longevity performance that is expected by our ah utility customer in the other part I think it’s equally important. It’s often ignored. We have new technology getting adopted that is the user experience. For example, if you have a new product in the field when they’re being put to use like it deployed you have lineman and these people they put their lives on the line. You know they work with your product. Um.

James McWalter

And.

Jason Huang

How readily can they work with your product does it require new tools. new equipment new trainings we purposefully design the product to be compatible with standard way of working for the past century by the way though. The the conductor that is dominating in today’s power grid was invented in 198 so people were in the industry who are used to do things the way it has been for the past entry and if you suddenly change their practice. Require new tools new equipment that’s going to make it little bit more challenging for them to consider and adopt your technology. So we also took care of that part and you don’t get it right? The first time so in the manufacturing process. Um, we being. Doing the manufacturing actually the mentor was evolved since 2016 so this is not like you’re building it from scratch the noctar technology has already been deployed in both distribution circuit as well as in transmission circuit.

Jason Huang

So it’s a proven technology ready to be deployed at all the voltage levels.

James McWalter

And when I hear things like ah you know the the existing conductors that are in the overhead wires that you know the audience walks by every day. Um, probably have a copper basis or something similar and they’ve been basically were invented in the early twentieth century and have not been. You know majorly improved for 100 years what were the main barriers to the innovation in this space because I can definitely see understand how some industries are pretty slow to move. You may have a generation you know a few decades even of ah, kind of stagnation in innovation. But when I hear something like something did not change for 100 years is that because we just didn’t have the material science. Ah you know innovation itself to make changes or was it mostly down to some of these barriers to adoption when you have a very kind of risk versus organization like a local utility. Okay.

Jason Huang

I would say already above and and plus some other factors. Let me see if I can summarize it in a way that your audience can’t understand one is related to the the overriding need for reliability safety.

Jason Huang

You need a product that can provide the assurance of reliability safety longevity and that has not come along I would argue until Ots is is is available and there’s also that element of mature science. Um. What we feature in the ts technology. We have the a Neo aluminum which has the best connectivity that was actually featured in in the 1970 s technology called acss it has the steel technology combined with a need aluminum and steel by the way it is. Ah, you know higher Grace Theore with greater strengths compared to what was used in the nineteen what was developing 198 and that’s a niche product. It is only used for high temperature use typically because they’re little more expensive and then the composite piece. Ah. That you could also argue. It’s becoming a mature technology carbon fiber composite has been around since the 1970 s so it’s also about 50 years so it did take mature science evolution to make what we use in terms of the foundation or technology available today. And a proven technology by the way. Um, and I think the third element had to do with regulations the environment. The utilities are operating for example in today’s regulation um, you know, utilities. We have many you know there’s the western only utilities there are munies and the co-ops. You know there are thousands of them. They’re all regulated either by especially the io the emestinol utility by Ferc or by the state energy commissioners. And there is no mechanism today to Motivate Grid Power grid to improve on efficiency for example and um, you know the utilities are encouraged to make investment.

Jason Huang

And then they’re allowed a coupon rate to basically collect the return on their investment. There is no mechanism to to motivate them to let’s say use a more advanced conductor more efficient cut the loss which will ultimately benefit the ratepayers benefit the environment as well.

Jason Huang

Because you are generating less waste and yet there’s no mechanism for them to retain some of that benefit. Um, and sometimes when you use the more advanced conductor. It’s going to cost you a little bit more in the in the first cost.

But we we actually are able to reduce the overall capex cost but some people don’t look at that way and if you look at the life cycle or cost benefit. It is a total absolute. No-brainer that you should look at a more advanced conductor because they’re more efficient.

Jason Huang

In addition to providing you far more capacity than that you need in today’s environment

James McWalter

Yeah, on the on that capex point I’ve talked to a few folks at yeah various utilities from connnadison pg ah Pg and e and and and so on and um and as part of conversations I was having with potential startups that I might start myself and you know talking about like. What what would it take to sell to utilities and like what are the various elements and 1 person was like no matter what you do try to focus on capex because there’s often not the money for the opex. You know if you want to go in and pitch some sort of nice cool software solution right? because that’s the kind of world I’m more coming from ah rather than the hardware side. It’s like can you make it a capex expenditure on the software in some way because otherwise you might often struggle to actually get funded um by these kind of customers and so I think it’s something that’s quite opaque to to people on the outside just how things like how they spend money how they kind of deal with vendors. Has such a kind of ah artificially constraining um aspect of you know the kind of environment of people trying to sell into these organizations the utilities and so on and so it’s it’s absolutely something that that needs to be revised and and worked on I guess one other element is the regulatory state and so. When we’re dealing with ah things that affect critical infrastructure like the the grid often you have various kind of regulations that govern what can be done in in that case is the regulatory state ready for innovations like what ts has um and how can we improve the speed of regulation when we do have these new step change technologies like. The ts conductors and.

Jason Huang

that’s ah that’s a great question. Um on the regulation side I think even Ferc and the state commissioners. They recognize the massive challenge we face in terms of climate change. Ah, in terms of the need to integrate to facilitate the integration of all the renewable generations in our power grid is how do I put it. It’s it’s old on average in the us the power grid is about transmission grid is about thirty years old you know it’s it’s. It’s into the second half of its design life um to to address that regulation can play I would say enabling role and 1 aspect For example I just talked about. Is the efficiency. You know you you think about automobile department energy has guidelines set in the place may not be mandatory in the beginning that that you you have a kind of ah improved target for fuel economy and that has I would say made a huge difference in terms of How efficient the motors are the cars are I think the same thing can be done related to grid efficiency. We spend far more time and effort to improve only efficiency in our refrigerators microwaves dishwashers and you get insamitized for it but yet. The power grid system itself. We don’t pay attention to the efficiency aspect. Um I would also ask that the utility themselves in the past has always been conservative risk averse you have employees who are really you know. Got a job for life. Um, they don’t necessarily get rewarded for being innovative step out in the box and if you if you do let’s say do things the old way nobody will challenge you or ask you right? And that’s that that.

Jason Huang

That creates an environment to to be risk of worse as well and granted you know power grid need to be reliable need to provide that electricity. You know whenever you need however much you need, but we’re in the twenty first century we need to use twenty first century solutions for our problems instead of relying on ah early twentieth century technology to solve our pressing problems today. So I would really urge our regulatory um agencies. And also I would say environmentalal activist can also play a role and bring awareness to them people by by nature wanting to do good. You know for the community for society for humanity for our environment. Ah, many of the. I think even the regulators and commissioners give them a lot of credit because they face a monumental challenge. Um I think with time they will see it. But it’s going to benefit by creating more awareness of technologies like Ts that is available to deploy. You don’t need breakthrough innovations to make a difference. We can make a difference a huge difference today by having a environment that allows utilities to be a little bit more bold in also to think outside the box in them.

Jason Huang

To kind of force a mechanism that advanced technology are also looked at at least as a option and I could argue that we can reduce capex we can certainly reduce operating expense. Ah let me just give you a specific number when you think about building a new transmission line. Sometimes in in this country. It takes about 8 to 10 years from the planning phase only five percent of the project is spent on conductors 25% is on the structures when you use the right technology like ours. We can hugely impact the structural cost like fewer towers shorter towers. The foundation will be a lot cheaper as well. You have less encroachment of the of the environment and that 5% expenditure in the entire project by the way dictates the throughput.

Jason Huang

Dictates the agency of the line and we should certainly do far more and you know when you talk about leverage that is where the leverage is. That’s where you can spend a little bit more money so that you are impacting the overall project expense and you also have 50 years of line loss saving benefit that is available to you so that’s the kind of thinking process. We should have we should encourage our regulators to consider should encourage our utility operators to consider as well.

James McWalter

Yeah I think there’s a lot of like really fascinating kind of thoughts in there I mean one way I think about risk and risk aversion I guess is that I think we’d want you know people who are running critical infrastructure to be risk averse. But it’s down to the timeline that they’re risk averse on right. If you are if we’re kind of barreling into a you know future of electrifying everything where the grid itself just needs to massively you know, increase in size like moving into a world of just regular brownouts and blackouts is something that we should be very risk averse about right? like and not enabling that. Versus I guess the risk aversion of an individual and an organization like utility or a regulator who might be risk averse about you know, doing everything doing anything new at all, right? and it’s like if you we can lengthen the timeline for that risk aversion where it’s like okay, let’s not have the grid collapse in 4 years or 8 years or 12 years I think then there’s more of an appetite to explore these new technologies because I think what’s definitely I think is now accepted is that the status quo will not work right? like that that I think has that message has been definitely delivered as we’ve seen things like what happened in Texas you know last year as we see you know, um, and and those events are going to. Occur more more often and so it’s like can we get out ahead of those things by um, you know, improving process like that’s number 1 right? improving like the nature of things you mentioned the the interconnection queue taking three and a half years right now. Um I think pgm which for the audience covers Pennsylvania and a few states kind of close to Pennsylvania. Ah, they just announced a change their queue but it’ll take 2 years to like make the change that will actually slightly speed it up and that means you basically just have all this clean energy which is basically funded like the moneys there just sitting on the sidelines just waiting to be deployed and that combination of factors means that we’re just moving way slower. And for once it’s not money. That’s the issue. It’s all these other structural elements that are in place.

Jason Huang

Yeah, um, James I wanted to add 2 points like ah it’s it’s like a myth one is new technology will add more risk. It’s actually the opposite when you look at a technology like ts. We actually help to improve resiliency while you are modernizing your power grid or just give you an example I was in Florida meeting with Fpo and nexttera and they have challenges with hurricane wind becoming more intense and their power grid. Ah, need to be prepared to handle that type of load at the same time you needed more capacity. It’s a paradigm you know you you need more capacity. You’re going to need bigger conductors, a bigger conductor with a stronger way is going to put your towers and infrastructure at greater risk with ts technology. We don’t have to go bigger in size to give you more capacity. We can use the same size conductor give you 2 x capacity and our conductor is compact that minimizes the wind load and our conductor is a low sag so that you can also reduce tension to the you know to the towers to the poles. Ah, when you when you when you install it so that you have less tension to the top so you can actually have have them all without having a compromise the other part I would argue is the myth about okay when you go green there is a green premium you know in some cases that’s true. Ah, with ts you could actually go green and get green. What do I mean by that when you are able to leverage the massive line loss saving benefit and make that available to the rate pairs. Because by and large the rapier are financing the um you know the the power grid expansions or modernizations because they optimally pay for the electricity if the line loss is included in the analysis. They are actually getting a. Better deal out of the investment or they could actually start with a lower capex if they use ts technology in far lower operating expense because you don’t have much of a loss to speak of so you can go green and get green as well. And but you do that with ts technology. You’re also helping the environment and so we you know these? ah myths they need to be demystified. You know for for the for the truth to be known for everyone.

James McWalter

No absolutely and and I think yeah, somewhat whatever what we’re trying to do on on the podcast. But I think in general the anything that touches the electrical grid has been so just the water we swim in as a society for so long that we just don’t really think about it. You know I click a switch the light turns on. You know I had a button my microwave works those things are just such a fundamental element that all the kind of elements that allow that to happen because they’re all being changed because of the nature of moving to intermittent supply and demand as we move to renewables as we electrify more and more of the common world. I think demystifying those elements I think brings about the kind of more rapid change. It brings about you know consumer change it brings around regulatory change brings about utility change and and also the companies that changed and adopt and kind of develop new innovative kind of approaches in order to kind of solve for those different problems. Um, and I guess. You know, thinking about you know Ts and and kind of next steps I was reading about. You know you recently had this kind of very very large rates of capital to start building out your first kind of manufacturing facility in the us but some big you know, quite famous investors like breakthrough energy and so on. Where where’s kind of that today you know what? what are the kind of process to kind of get that that first factory and up and running so.

Jason Huang

Yeah, thanks for actually asking that question. First off, we are very blessed with our investor group breakthrough is a visionary investor and um, they know the global challenges they have patience. They invest in hard tech like ours they have to build factory to make a difference and we really appreciate them for their leadership. We’re also very grateful for utilities like national grid nextera fpl. These are thought leaders. These are early adopters of technology in the industry. You know I do remember you made a comment about how you get new technologies adopted in ah in a conservative industry. Um, you know, even even in the conservative industry. You have some players that are. Progressive that our thought leaders early adopters you wanted to focus your energy with them. We’ve been very fortunate to have a national grid and also next era to invest in us and they also have shown us a tremendous interest. In taking our technology forward as well. Um, and I also think that they speak volumes on behalf of the rest of the industry and the others are just not used to do things the way they do national grid and next era. So what. National grid nextter is is working with us is going to help the entire industry as well. In terms of the facilities we have. We’re building our first facility in California and there’s a massive need for fire remediation effort and you mentioned about p and e I just needed to bring a point. We our technology have been selected by Pg and e in its open space challenge sometimes you look at a massive utility p and e you know they’re not very progressive but when you are faced with challenges. You know they being very creative. Ah, soliciting solutions worldwide. So we’ve been very fortunate. We do have ah enabling technology for them and we’re working with some of our partners in industry like prismian to bring technology solutions for them and um so you know these are. These are things that will help the overall industry. Um, we are we should be in production phase in our facility here by about midsummer um I would say before August we will be making products.

James McWalter

So very exciting.

32:41.20

Jason Huang

Out of our facility in California and that is very exciting. That’s a milestone event and our team has worked really hard by the way we have a great team culture in case I didn’t mention it. We have a great team. Um, our vision. For our company is probably a little bit different than most of the other companies we care about our employees and partners. We care about their happiness fulfillment in not just material sense but also spiritual aspect. We believe that is important.

Jason Huang

And we also believe that as a company. There’s an obligation to society to humanity especially in today’s environment you have this massive climate change and we’re committed to make a difference for the world and lastly we like to. Get our technology to the phase that we can be the choice to rewire the world with our technology and and when we do that we can improve capacity ah capacity throughput in our power grid to accommodate all the renewables and. To improve efficiency that has been ignored in the past century as well as providing that enabling self-monitoring capability which is not possible in today’s wire today’s wire are dumb wires. Um, these are things these are missions of ts. And we’re really excited about what we could do for the for the world.

James McWalter

Yeah, ah, but ah, it’s absolutely fantastic I Guess on the um on that kind of cultural Piece. You know one of the things that we’re seeing right now is a move of the you know the most highly skilled you know workers and in the economy moving to things that have more of an impact right. Um, it’s started. You know when the the great resignation. Although so supposedly looking at the research. The great resignation was not quite as great as large as as if kind of seen initially, but you’re definitely seeing. Ah yeah, people who might be working at ah companies that are large tech companies. Maybe they don’t like the direction of those. They’re looking at climate Tech they’re looking at other areas where they can have more of an impact in their kind of day-to-day. Yeah, and you mentioned that this kind of you know the spiritual flourishing element. How does that I guess ah you know appear within the kind of company culture in a direct way. Um, because I think that it’s something that a lot more teams are trying to cultivate and maybe are struggling to do So yeah.

Jason Huang

Yeah let me expand a little bit about the 6 principle values at ts we at the very top. It’s a pyramid. It’s customer first without customer there’s nothing there. We don’t have to explain that right below it. Have 2 values that are important one is teamwork that is within and also with partners with customers. You know you mentioned about the culture. Um the spiritual aspect teamwork should be simple because we trust each other. And the trust is not easy if you have egos in the middle when you are able to see through the egos and really understand who we are as a being um, you’d be able to have a much greater appreciation for humanity.

Jason Huang

We actually are one. You know that oneness um I was impressed I saw a picture which is comparing the human lawng with the tree. The tree takes in what we breathes out and we take in what the tree breathes out.

Jason Huang

You know that code dependency that harmonious one is. It’s really amazing and we need to think it that way and teamwork is also just like that as well and then we have safety reliability. It is not just thinking about what.

Jason Huang

We locally as a team you know in our in our company but also the extended team that includes alignment that includes the utility workers that they work with our product and and then right below that we have 3 values that are important one is continuous improvement. I’m of the view that even with our technology I would argue It is best in the world. There’s still room to improve and we have a smart conductor in the works that will change the world again in the conductor space. Um. You know with continuous improvement I’m going to share with you. My perspectives about putting the effort having passion by the way The the fifth value is you have to have passion and energy to you know to to come to Work. It’s like um, you got to love what you do and do what you love. And if you’re stuck in a place if you still needed to make a living at least learn to like your work because otherwise life is too short. Why why choose to be miserable. You can make a difference in that selection in the last wise commitment.

Jason Huang

So back to the continuous improvement. Um, it’s a compounding fact I urge my colleagues and and and you know people I’m I meet I observe I’m a mature scientist by training so you can see my passions about Ma material science.

James McWalter

Absolutely yeah.

Jason Huang

Why I am excited about ts technology if we aim for one hundred point one percent what does that mean every day we have about 1000 minutes that we manage you know rest of it. You sleep and you eat and you know just nonproductive hours necessary minutes by the way. If every day we squeeze the 1 extra minute that is the one hundred point one percent effort if you do the compounding because the effort you put in today. You know that effect is compounded by next day’s 101001 ndred one thousand one minute if you do it for a whole year six three hundred and sixty five days that extra minute every day is 1.4 x compared to someone who’s just doing 100 if you do it forty years on a continuous basis that is 2000000 times if you are not successful. Something is wrong. Okay, so you are putting in basically the 1 minute extra effort that’s creating a 2000000 times compounded impact. Why shouldn’t you be successful and then the other point that I wanted to make about the continuous improvement is the 100 % principle the way I look at the 100% is you do need to pursue perfection in products in manufacturing as well. Just imagine you know we make products you make a conductor.

Jason Huang

You start with carbon fiber resins and then you do protrusion and then you do encapsulations and so on so forth if we screw up especially toward the latter stage the manufacturing step. You’re not. You know you are only 99.5 percent there. You might be scrapping the entire lot. Just think about all the wasted material wasted labor and effort wasted resources. We have to pursue the 100% as well and if if nothing else if your audience can take in the one hundred point one percent principle the 100% pursue for perfection I think it’s going to do them well for their for their lives.

James McWalter

Yeah, and I think it also goes to the core of even the technology itself and we talked a little bit about this at the beginning of the conversation. Ah, where technology makes a massive change is where it is a new point of leverage and this word leverage when you’re trying to leverage that extra point one percent or that extra minute a day. But you’re trying to leverage. You know a new type of advanced material in this new way that affects like a very large existing problem that nobody else was solving and all the way down through all the different ways that we kind of interact with the world I think searching for leverage is like something that that. I think more people need to talk about and there’s a mentor of mind. He says you know most people say don’t work harder work smarter but he also has he’s like there’s actually a better one. Ah further which is work braver right work would more seek things that have more leverage. Um, because again, even if you’re working smarter. There’s always maybe some. Other form of leverage whether there’s risk whether it’s kind of identifying areas of even greater productivity and so on that you can kind of capitalize on. Um, but Jason this is this has been a great conversation I I love kind of finishing off on on those kind of elements of culture. It’s’s super exciting before you finish off is there anything I should have asked you about but did not okay.

Jason Huang

Yeah, um, you did ask and I probably didn’t have time to respond we are looking for employees and colleagues and partners in ts on the world stage. We look for agents distributors. Representative of our technology in the product because this technology is not just us technology. We wanted to benefit the grid of the world basically everywhere so we look for partners that way if anybody’s interested in that let us know we also look for. Employees partners with cts that that can help us ah in manufacturing technology development finance business development. We have needs across the board and we do have a precondition you have to. Respect and like the 6 principal values that I mentioned about customer first teamwork safety continuous improvement passion and commitment and we have the commitment for you. Ah, we also like you to have commitment for us that is. You come to work bring your heart and mind with you as well to work and in the process. The company will be able to provide that fulfillment of what you wanted in life in both material as well as spiritual aspect and includes your family as well. So. It would be a great journey if someone were to join ts we. We need more talent and we could use more support more partners in the world.

James McWalter

Thank thank you Jason and we’ll include all those links and contact details in the show notes. This is great. Thank you so much.

Jason Huang

Thank you very much and I really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you and be you know, let more people know about advanced technologies like Ts and the difference they could make for the for the world. So thank you for that.

James McWalter

Like thank you Jason.

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